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administration is rejecting calls to plant -- grand, sita nsa leaker edward snowden. in a letter given to a german lawmaker last week, snowden called on the u.s. to drop charges against him, writing "speaking the truth is not a crime." on sunday, dan pfeiffer ruled out clemency and said snowden should return to face criminal charges. in some of the latest snowden's disclosures, the "new york times" reports the nsa intercepted the talking points of view into secretary -- you would secretary-general ban ki- moon ahead of a meeting with president obama in april. we will have more on the story with the reporter scott shane after the headlines. a newly disclosed document shows the british government justified detaining the partner journalist glenn greenwald by accusing him of espionage and terrorism. in august, david maranda was on his way home to brazil when he was held from his nine hours at london's heathrow airport. he faced repeated interrogation, had many personal items seized, .ncluding some -- thumb drives an internal police order authorizing greatest attention from that they says -
nsa programs that included spying on foreign leaders in a house intelligence hearing today. in the testimony, national intelligence director james clapper and nsa director keith alexander says data collected was provided to the nsa by other country's intelligence agencies. this hearing is chaired by michigan congressman mike rogers. [inaudible conversations] >> i'll only accept the decorum and only those recognized to speak. i'd like to welcome the first pam today, director of the national intelligence, james clapper, deputy attorney general james cole, national security agency director, keith alexander, deputy director of the nsa, chris england. following the first panel, moving immediately into the second panel of nongovernment experts who are very knowledgeable on fisa and privacy issues. today's hearing is an open forum to discuss potential amendments to the foreign intelligence surveillance act and possible changes to the way fisa applications are handled by the department of justice and the nsa. i hope that all of our witnesses will give clear answers about how propos
intelligence james clapper james clapper,, deputy attorney the deputyes cole, director of the nsa, chris inglis. we will move immediately into the second panel of non- governmental experts knowledgeable on fisa issues. we will discuss possible changes to the way fisa applications are handled by the department of justice. i hope all of our witnesses will give clear answers about how proposals under consideration at congress would affect the nsa's ability to stop terrorist attacks. i am going to submit my statement for the record in order to ask some questions following the opening statement and your opening statements in relation to some of the news of the day to get some things clarified for the record. it will be important for the american people. .e do expect a vote we will hold as long as we can. we will take a brief intermission. there are only two votes. we should be able to recess or a short time and return. i will recognize any opening comment. for comingu, panel, here today. hopefully, we will get the facts on the table and let the american people understand what we do and how we do it.
>> embroiled in an embarrassing spy scandal, president obama may order the n.s.a. to stop eaves dropping on the leaders of american allies, stripping the agency of some of its powers. >> a pakistan. >> i family that lost their grandmother to a drone strike is on capitol hill to tell their story. first, they share it with aljazeera america. >> sex crimes on campus, surprising new research that the majority of attacks on campus of committed by repeat offenders. >> it's hard breaking. >> it was heart wrenching. >> one year after hurricane sandy, some families still have not been able to pic pick up the pieces. why an insurance loophole is preventing some from rebuilding their storm-ravaged homes. >> good morning. welcome to august america. it's great to have you with us. i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm thomas day den. the national security agency is now under fire here at home. >> both the president and congress are considering changes that would limit the n.s.a.'s sweeping ability to collect intelligence. >> words like constraint, transparency and increased oversight are now used when ta
. >> there has not been a mass casualty here in the u.s. since 2001. that's not by luck. >> the head of the n.s.a. defiantly defending the spy agency. the general says gathering intelligence around the world is critical and helps to keep america safe from terrorists. >> the war raging in syria claiming some surprising new victims. children are being diagnosed with polio because they don't have access to adequate health care. >> it is reported that at 8:58 p.m., a huge object believing to be a meteor right fell on a farm. >> 75 years ago, martians innovated the planet or people listening to the radio thought they did. a look back at the war of the world broadcast that caused widespread panic across the country. >> good morning. welcome to aljazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. >> good to have you with us on this wednesday. two hours from now, the health and human services secretary will testify. >> many are saying she should be fired. >> kathleen see bellous will be asked to explain the failure of the health care website. we have more on what she might say today. >> good morning. you know, kathleen
? >> well, let me say something about the nsa. i believe the nsa is filled with good patriotic people who want to do the right thing. they follow the orders they're given. the administration controls intelligence. the national intelligence framework is put together by the administration. it begins with the director of national intelligence, it goes to the white house, it's the president, it's the nsc the cabinet and then the framework is formed. now, what happens is, people add to it, state wants this, department of state wants to know this. or somebody else wants to know that. priorities are ranked. as i understand it these are the priorities. one, terrorism. two, support of our military abroad. three, nuclear counter proliferation. four, hard targets. and now cyber. and those are the main areas. so essentially the nsa is told to do certain things and it does it. what i think we need to do, we work very well with the house committee and leadership, mike rogers and congressman rupersberger is review of the intelligence framework of how all this gets together. what the criteria for inclusi
♪ >>> hello, welcome to al jazeera america. i'm jonathan betz, live in new york. >> the nsa denies reports president obama knew about and approved the spying on germany's chancellor. >> after months held hostage farc frees a u.s. marine. >> syria submits a plan for getting rid of its chemical weapons three days before the deadline. >> remembering rock pioneer lou reed. the former velvet underground died at the age of 71, today. [ ♪ theme ] >>> international uproar over reports the u.s. spied on germany's chancellor is not going away. there are claims president obama knew about the phone taps and approved them - the white house says it is not true. we are getting reports that the eavesdropping started in 2002, before angela merkel was elected. >> this morning senator jeanne shaheen called on the nsa to come clear on the surveillance program. >> i think the revelations from edward snowden, and secrets that are revealed are doing damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, mexico and other countries where the suggestion is that we've lisped in -- listened in. i think we hav
the world. this has been making big news abroad. the directors of national intelligence and the nsa will testify on capitol hill today about u.s. surveillance at home and around the world. >> meanwhile, president obama has ordered a review of intelligence gathering outside of the country where as hala says, this has been big news, trying to calm what has become an international diplomatic storm. here's his take. >> that's why i'm initiating now a review to make sure what they're able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. >> let's bring in elyse la by the at the state department. here's the question that not just in the united states but outside of the united states people have. what can you tell us about president obama possibly ordering the nsa to stop spy ong leaders of allied states and did he know this spying was going on when it was indeed happening? >> well, in terms of what he knew and when he knew it, none of us really know. the white house is saying that president obama knew this summer when an internal review that was started revealed that this was happ
with the latest in the nsa controversy. ambassador to spain, james costas it was called after reports of 60 medical spanish phone calls. >> the european union met behind closed doors. german parliamentians would like to know why they tapped chancellor angela merkel's phone calls. >> we are not considering our chancellor as a terrorist. therefore, i would say they have to think about or to reconsiderk . . . lz >> >> ? >> >>> welcome to al jazeera america. i'm stephanie here are the top stories. a bipartisan group of lawmakers plans to introduce a bill that could strip the nsa of om of its powers. if passed it ends the agency's ability to bulk collect phone records and restrict who it can spy on. >> fighting in syria blocked u.n. inspectors from access to two chemical weapons facilities, a setback in an attempt to rid syria of chemical weapons. inspectors did not say whether the syrian rebels or the government was responsible for the delay. negotiations for access are under way. >>> abortion right supporters in texas are celebrating a legal victory after a judge found provisions of the aborti
' time the director of national intelligence and the director of the nsa will face congressional grilling. we will talk with our correspondent in washington after this story by bernard smith. >>> this could be about to end. in an interview, president barack obama says that national security operations generally have one purpose: to make sure the american people are safe. but i'm initiating now a review to make sure what they're able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. >> this has partly been prompted by reports in germany that president obama was briefed on the surveillance of chancellor angela merkel's phone in 2010. officials say that's not true and the white house only discovered surveillance in the summer and the bugging of merkel's phone soon after. the delegation that's visiting is concerned about the surveillance of tens of millions of its citizens. calls in the country in the space of a month. >> we need to figure out why this kind of activity is happening and what kind of trust needs to be rebuilt. in the end we're fighting a battle in terms of security and
are the top stories. president obama says his administration is reviewing the nsa policy on spying, after weeks of protests from the european nations about ease droving on world leaders. a european delegation is in washington this week talking about spying reports with u.s. government officials. 26 young men will soon receive a payout totalling $60 million from penn state university. the school is giving this settlement to victims abused by jerry sandusky a little more after a year for 45 counts of child sex abuse. >>> rick perry says a federal ruling will not stop ongoing efforts to protect women. a federal judge has tossed out some abortion restrictions passed by the texas legislature this summer calling them unconstitutional. the new rules were scheduled to take effect tuesday. the state's attorney general is appealing the ruling. >>> those are the headlines at this hour. i am john seigenthaler. "consider this" with antonio moro is next. i will see you here with the news and you can get the latest on aljazeera.com. >>> the white house back pedalling after more nsa backlash. internation
'll have a fair and balanced debate coming up. >>> and the blame game over the nsa surveillance program. who the agency's chief says is really responsible for all the recent scandals. >>> plus, how the unemployment rate is having a major impact, get this, on our beer industry. ♪ hmm. ♪ mm-hmm. [ engine revs ] ♪ [ male announcer ] oh what fun it is to ride. get the mercedes-benz on your wish list at the winter event going on now -- but hurry, the offer ends soon. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease the 2014 glk350 for $419 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. tomato florentine soup, it took a little time to get it just right. [ ding ] ♪ but finally, it happened. perfection. at progresso, we've got a passion for quality, because you've got a passion for taste. at progresso, we've got a passion for quality, when you do what io, iyou think about risk.. i don't like the ups and downs of the market, but i can't just sit on my cash. i want to be prepared for the long haul. ishares minimum votility etfs. investments designed for a smoother ride. find out why 9 out of 1
of the nsa and the president's top intelligence chief are both there to testify as anger and suspicion grow over accusations of widespread u.s. spying. the worst of it, tapping the phones of u.s. allies. >> we, all of us in the intelligence community, are very much aware that the recent unauthorized disclosures have raised concerns that you've alluded to, both here in congress and across the nation, about our intelligence activities. we know the public wants to understand how its intelligence community uses its special tools and authorities and to judge whether we can be trusted to use them appropriately. we believe we have been lawful and at the rigorous oversight we've operated under has been effective. >> here are a couple questions. these are the biggies. what did the president know? when did he know it and what specifically depends on who you ask. the senate intelligence committee chaired by diane feinstein, she says, we knew nothing, claiming they were kept in the dark about what the nsa was up to. but other officials say president obama or at least his white house staff knew all abou
an intelligence apparatus . the direction of national intelligence, and nsa director both set to testify about u.s. spying allegations from brazil to germany. randall pinkston joins us live on capital hill, and randall they said trust has to be in their words rebuilt between the u.s. and its allies. are stepping being taken to do that? >> given all of the issues right now, the administration certainly did not need the headache of having it revealed that the u.s. has been spying on some of its top allies. they are meeting with the nsa director, keith alexander who will be testifying later today on intelligence. they will be grilled, both of them, alexander as well as james clapper on the extent of america's spying operations and there will also be the introduction of legislation to scale back to modify the patriot act. this legislation will be introduced by the author of the patriot act, and among other things it will put restrictions on the gathering of metadata, as well as refining the extent to which america can engage in foreign intelligence, and presumably that will take into account spying
acknowledging more constraints are needed and he is being criticized over the nsa tapped angela merkel's phone and snooped on other european allies and we have more. >> reporter: the practice of listening in on the phone calls of the leaders of allied countries could be about to end. in an interview president barack obama says that national security operations generally have one purpose, to make sure the american people are safe. but i'm initiating now a review to make sure what they are able to do doesn't necessarily mean it's what they should be doing. this is prompted by reports in germany that president obama was briefed on the surveillance of chancellor merkel's known in 2010. administration officials say it's not true and a white house review only discovered the surveillance of world leaders in the summer and say the bugging of merkel's phone and soon after. a delegation from the european parliament visiting washington is worried about the surveillance of 10s of millions of its citizens and one report from spain suggests the nsa tracked 60 million calls in the country in the space of a
. an italian magazine claimed the nsa spied on benedict and his successor. and it reported that he listened in on cardinals. the vatican says, "we are not aware of anything on this issue. in any case we have no concerns about it. >> in the next few hours results from an unofficial referendum. the oil-rich state straddles sudan and south suedan. the ngok dinka tribe held the poll. neither country recognises the vote. >> in france - a match you won't want to miss. francis hollande takes on the football clubs later on thursday. he's proposing a 75% top rate of tax. club bosses say it will make it impossible to compete at the european level and are cancelling to -- are threatening to cancel all matches in the final week of november. >> the box are world series champions, after crushing st louis cardinals 6-1, kath turner reports from the famous fork. >> the boston -- fenway park. the boston party has begun. fans that couldn't get tickets eventually made it into the park. the red sox victory celebrations is about more than sporting glory. all season the team carried the hopes of a city, which is
countries. the resolution is expected to be voted on later this month. >> n.s.a. leader edward snowden is speaking up and reaching out. the germans are interested in bringing him to berlin if he tells them about the surveillance of german chancellor angela merkel. >> david chater reports from moscow. >> edward snowden shows every sign of going native. the snapshot showing him enjoying a river cruise in moscow. he held a meeting with an mp from the green party. he said their discussions were revealing. at a press conference the mp said edward snowden would about willing to go germany as a witness to the bugging of angela merkel's phone by the u.s. >> translation: he told me he could imagine coming to germany if it was clear he could remain here in safety. this means granting free passage and asylum. the interior minister could offer this and fulfil the moral obligation to help him. >> it's reported edward snowden is starting a job in st. petersburg as a technical advisor to russia's version of facebook. he may not be happy with the news that the federal security service in moscow is be
you about afghanistan. but i want to start with the dustup over the n.s.a. allegedr our, you know, espionage of friends and allies around the world. >> still alleged? pretty muchit is acknowledged. i tried to get an explicit acknowledgement out of the and they haven't gone that far. >> what was the apology for if haven't acknowledged it? anyway. about angelament merkel is that the united states is not and will not be in on her phone conversations. there was never any statement about the past tense. was always current, future. did you know this was going on? you got all of the security -- specifically. i think the most that i would have known would have been the would have been the intelligence assessments. saying specifically where they came from. in other words, it could be say, well, that the source of assessment would be high level officials, for instance, in a country. but you don't know that was one on one or transferred anonymously in conversation. whether it was overheard. the source is -- they don't describe in the reports that we get that so and so's phone was -- conversa
to have that level playing field if we're going to succeed. >> does, do the geopolitical tensions over nsa stuff, is that damaging to the prospects of a t-tip agreement? >> look, it is obviously a serious issue that is out there. our view is that these issues are to be kept on separate tracks, in the right lanes of dialogue between officials on both sides. you have heard from a number of europeans that they see the logic of moving ahead with t- tip. it is important to their growth strategy to tighter -- to try to maintain competitiveness. we are hopeful we will continue to make progress on that. we have teams in brussels. there are negotiations that had to be canceled during the shutdown of the government but are back on track. we expect to continue those discussions in the coming weeks. >> a number of people have mentioned regulatory alignment, in autos. can you give us more detail of what that means in practice? if you are bmw, what are the challenges of having different regulatory regimes on both sides of the atlantic? >> one is obvious the crash testing. cars have to be crash tested in
worker edward snowden, revelations that the nsa spied on germany's chancellor angela merkel have proadvocated outrage in the country. >>> french police have released a sketch of a man wanted for the murder of a family in the alps, a shooting that is still unexplained. >>> a dutch children's rights organization is warning of what it describes as an e epidemic of youngsters being forced to perform sexual acts. handed those names to interpol. >> she is the weapon against sex traffic, she is not real. prowling the web for sex, one group trying to end it all. these are some of the men who have been identified as terrorists. researchers log on to chattel rooms pretending to be young girls. within seconds they are being offered money in return for things we cannot repeat. >> whenever i open a chat room dozens of men swarm at me within minutes. from families, good jobs, they're athletes, it's unbelievable how diverse the pattern is. >> this is one of the chat rooms the team are using. 10 f philippines. ten years old, female, philippines. we deliberately kept the camera a little bit far a
national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> is a tough time for nsa. we say, it is much more important for this country that we defend this nation and take than it is to give up a program that would result in this nation being attacked. we would rather be here in front of you today, telling you why we defended these programs, then having given them up and have our nation or our allies be attacked and people killed. >> this weekend on c-span, intelligence officials defend the nsa surveillance programs. 10:00 a.m.rning at eastern. live sunday on c-span 2. kelly.lls for kitty on c-span 3 "american history tv," each weekend in november, remembering john f. kennedy. eyewitness accounts. john foster dulles had recently died when that super airport out of chantilly, virginia was being built. president eisenhower announced the airport would be named dulles airport. when kennedy took over, he did not want to name that for a crusty old warrior. finally, the decision was made to name it after dulles. you can still see the clip of kennedy opening the airport with eisenhower there and allen dulles
? intelligence officials assume we will over correct this. there will be a move to really constrain what the nsa and our andlligence agencies do talksf the 9/11 report about it. quite sure, it can go too far. -- >> sure. we are not anywhere near going to far. the pendulum can go to far. the whole nsa metadata issue is hard and fast. give you my views on it but nonetheless, i have not seen the pendulum swing too far yet. >> i have spoken to some officials, some off the record -- >> i don't think he's unstable. very friendly conversations, first of all. he's very direct, some of the about us ande said our people. i don't understand politics, by the way. why is he saying things that make it either on likely, less less likely,ikely, what's the politics? i don't get it. on the politician. forsee they say things public consumption -- i'm the politician. i know it's rare. once in a great while the politician will say something for the public that they don't exactly believe themselves or would say differently. why is he saying the things? the conversation i want to emphasize is that they are friendly, v
the better part of six months to sign up. it will be all right. >> it may be more than that. the nsa has a 1.4 billion utah data storage facility that keeps burning up due to electrical surges. ten meltdowns in the first 13 months. >> there are big website problems with obama care. i think what is refreshing right now is crickets of this obama care are starting to look at how do we fix it? how to fund this thing, we can't accept it as the new law. and we should remember that as this program was rolled out in massachusetts in 2006, it took roughly three years before major problems with the system began to get fixed. so, i think insurance companies involved with this and analysts i talked with will tell you the insurance companies want to wait until they are not going to rush to judgment in the first three weeks based on whether or not there were web glitches. >> 36 states are affected by this. what do you think? >> call it what you will. whatever you think about the whole concept and idea of obama care, the execution has been disastrous. this undermined a lot of confidence in the program,
a yahoo! address and they passed it to the nsa, which went and started monitoring the e-mail address. as soon as the e-mail came in from the united states, to that address, the nsa passed it to both n.y.p.d. and officials in colorado. i have been in rapid succession. i think that is a good take away for coming in now, for cooperation post-9/11, the real good cooperation does work frankly, thetraditional pic rankly the traditional police work for amed work for the fbi for so many decades that have kind of come under scrutiny and maybe people think don't work to fight terrorism like lady maranda lights are questioning them over a long period of time, watching and waiting. those kinds of things in the end, does work. and you know, we didn't need secret presents. we didn't need waterboarding. we didn't need guantÁnamo bay. collaboration and smart policing work to keep america safe. >> host: how are you able to get access to these records? >> guest: adam goldman, my co-author and i reported for "the associated press." for about 18 months through 2011 to early 2013, we were reporting on t
the world. a report in the "the washington post" cited documents leaked by former nsa contractor edward snowden. the latest allegations comes as a delegation from the european parliament is visiting washington to investigate claims of eavesdropping on european leaders and citizens. >> it became clear that the damage, image damage for the united states is so high something has to be done on that. i hope it will be successful because we need messages for our people that without purpose it cannot happen - or on citizens. >> people in kenya are calling for the government to take action against men who gang-raped a 16-year-old girl. in nairobi protesters gathered at freedom park and marched to police headquarters and demanded justice. let's look at the case and why it triggered anger. in june 6th men attacked a girl, known to the media assist liz. in a dune of busia. they then threw her into a pit, a latrine. a day later three men were handed in to the police. they were told to cut the grass of the police compound and sent home. >> it was not reported it the media until doctors treating the
nowhere. the timing is unfortunate. >> when most americans hear about the drone strikes and the n.s.a. scandals, a lot of people shrug. what are they missing? >> they don't see the consequences of this in their own lives. there are no drone strikes in the united states. one thing that is changing in the u.s. - the t.s.a. has started a process of looking at people before they fly. what they are doing is going through government and private databases. they are looking at property records, all kinds of private information to decide whether you should be allowed to board your plane. as that comes home, as people see it more in the united states, they'll ask questions about the level of surveillance. >> i'm meteorologist dave warren. we are talking about what you could wake up tomorrow morning. there's a black spot on one of the views from space. this is a while ago. this is what the eclipse looks like, the shadow of the mon on the surface of the earth. this is where the greatest eclipse will be, off the ost of av -- coast of africa. you'll see a park eclips along the east coast. sunrise a
in the damage assessment on edward snowden, the n.s.a. contractor who leaked classified documents about america's secret electronic surveillance programs. >> mike morell: i do not believe he was a whistleblower. i do not believe he is a hero. i think he has betrayed his country. >> miller: how serious a hit is that to national security? >> morell: i think this is the most serious leak-- the most serious compromise of classified information in the history of the u.s. intelligence community. >> miller: because of the amount of it? or the type? >> morell: the amount and the type. >> miller: but of the hundreds of pages of n.s.a. documents that snowden has leaked, morell pointed to one in particular that has caused a great deal of damage to u.s. intelligence. it's a copy of the top secret document the c.i.a. calls its" black budget." what value would that have to an adversary? >> morell: the real damage of leaking that document was that certainly they could focus their counter-intelligence efforts on those places where we're being successful and not have to worry as much about those places where we
that they felt that way in covering this important story in mali. >> n.s.a. whistle blower edward snowden sounding off. >> we're going to tell you what's in his open letter. why he's asking the u.s. for clemency. >> it feels like 2012 all over again. mitt romney attacking president obama over health care. why the former presidential candidate jumped into the debate. >> a special look at aging around the globe, starting in afghanistan, where life expectancy is among the lowest in the world. >> we're taking a live look at egypt right now. the protests there, you can see breaking up very quickly, just an hour ago. we saw hundreds of people outside of the courthouse where mohamed morsi's trial has just been adjourned to the new year. we'll be right back. >> good morning. welcome back to aljazeera america. >> some democrats in washington are worried they're going to lose jobs over the ongoing n.s.a. scandal. we'll talk with an experienced democratic strategist. >> let's get a look at what temperatures we can expect to see across the nation. i'm he can specking a lot of low temperatures. >> a l
in the "wall street journal" president obama did not know about the nsa spying on our allies. also, last night on "60 minutes" mass confusion in libya was documented. tonight the factor will analyze both stories with brit hume. >> i think things have gotten so bad inside iraq from the standpoint the iraqi people my belief is we will in fact be greeted as liberators. >> former vice president dick cheney makes his first appearance in the no spin zone. we will talk to him about iraq, afghanistan, and how he came back from near death. >> pinhead or patriot? >> i like him. >> you like him. >> i like him. >> you don't know who the vice president of the united states is. >> no. but i know the president though. >> you should be proud. >> also up ahead watters world pinhead and patriots. >> that's a very seductive look. >> caution, you are about to enter the no spin zone. the factor begins right now. thanks for watching us tonight. i don't want to know. that is the subject of this eveningens talking points memo. as we reported last week there are at least half a dozen major controversies inside the oba
about the drone attacks. the nsa revelations have undermined some confidence. now, there's a number of different reasons, but i think what i'm going to do is point out the reasons why i think we have not had as much success as we had hoped in terms of building broad support for our campaign and, second, what we ought to do about it. i think the reasons why are fairly clear. number one, as i mentioned, is the drone strikes. it has gotten a fair amount of attention. you know, the number of civilian casualties, the justification for those attacks. the world is focused on this. now, i do believe that drones are getting an unfair portion of the blame here. a drone is a weapon of war. i don't think the rest of the world would feel any better if we were launching cruise missiles from out in the ocean. i don't think that changes it. there's a little too much of an emphasis on how this has fundamentally changed things, that a drone is more dangerous than sending in a seal team on launching a bunch of cruise missiles. they're not the perfect instrument they are sometimes described to be, and
the n.s.a. this time it involves spying on u.n. secretary ban ki-moon. the "new york times" says the intelligence agencies intercepted talking points prior to moon's visit to president obama last april. the disclosure was considered an operational highlight in a top-secret report. the white house is not commenting on the article. there are reports that the administration ordered an end to surveillance of the organization. >> pakistan is re-evaluating relationships with the u.s. after the drone strike killed a top level ofcial. hakimullah mehsud was buried secretly. pakistan's ministers denounced the killing saying it sabotaged peace talks. >> efforts have been ambushed. it was not a fire from the front. it was an ambush. we see it as an ambush. >> some lawmakers went as farce as to demand u.s. supply lines into afghanistan be stopped. >> authorities filed murder charges against a man they say opened fire inside terminal 3 inside los angeles airport. officials say the shooter ignored ticket and baggage handlers, but was intent on taking out his rage on t.s.a. agents. brian rooney
clapper and nsa direct or general keith allen discussed the nsa surveillance program and spying on foreign governments before the house intelligence committee hearing earlier this week. >> i never expected to write an entire book on cancer until i was diagnosed at a relatively young age. i was diagnosed at 36. i was astonished at how different i thought it was -- how different i was going through treatment than what i had heard about cancer and what i expected cancer be. and i sort of expected it -- i expected it to run like a well oiled machine in which cure wasn't obviously guaranteed, but people knew about my particular cancer at be followed and what i found was being really, really different. i couldn't help but i started to write about it. >> the head of the wrecks on trans next round of talks, george washington university hosted regional experts were monday. a farmer winning presidential candidate and former official at the american embassy in a rant to our commenting on prospects for the agreement. the impact of president rouhani election. nuclear weapons talks begin on november 7.
of state john kerry weighs in on the spy activities of the national security agency, saying the n.s.a. went too far. >>> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm david shuster, here is a look at the headlines - witnesses describe chaos in terminal 3 of los angeles international airport after a gunman opened fire this morning morning. this video from tmz showed people running after hearing the shots. an agent was killed. several others were wounded. the federal bureau of investigation identified the gunman as 23-year-old paul ciancia of pennsville new jersey. president obama said he and nouri al-maliki, iraqi prime minister shook hands and discussed how the two can work together to fight al qaeda. nouri al-maliki is seeking military aid from the united states to fight the sebbing tare have been violence. >> a u.s. drone missile attack killed this man, hakimullah mehsud, one of the c.i.a.'s most wanted men. the u.s. accused him of killing thousands, and put a $5 million bounty on his head. hakimullah mehsud was suspected of planning an attack killing employees at a u.s. base in afghanistan. th
kerry says that the nsa spying on u.s. allies went too far. kerry telling an open government conference in london this week that some activities have been happening on what he calls automatic pilot without obama administration officials knowing about it. >>> scott carpenter is being remembered by family and friends at a funeral service in colorado. he died last month at the age of 88 from complications following a stroke. he was the second american to orbit the earth following john glenn's historic ride who will speak at the funeral. >>> time to fall back everybody. at 2:00 a.m., it's officially daylight saving time and end to that. set your clocks back one hour and enjoy that extra hour of sleep. that's a quick look at some of the stories making news right now. >>> well, one of the world's most wanted terrorists now dead, killed in a u.s. drone strike in pakistan. taliban leader. hakimullah mehsud. his death represents one of the highest level counterterrorism victories since the death of osama bin laden. joining us with his thoughts on what this could mean for the war on terror, we ha
against the nsa. this time, it involves spying on u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon. the new york sometimes says the intell sequence agency intercepted talking points from moon prior to his april visit with president obama. the disclosure was considered a operational highlight in a weekly top secret report. the white house has not commented on that article. there are reports the administration ordered an end to the surveillance of the organization. >> until cuba, new generation is asking for change in the island's 50-year-old system. as al jazeera's teresa bell reports, they are making their voices heard in aniquely american style. ♪ >> he likes to rap about his life, his family and cuba. his artistic name is river himan which means the potion man. he says here, his music is perceived as a threat. tra tra i think hip-hop is not convenient for the government because our society has had the same system for the last 50 years, our songs can open the hearts and the minds of people we represent what people here are silent about. you. >> in the land of chachacha, pop culture arrived in
-ed in "the l.a. times." you called for changes to be made to the nsa's massive phone data gathering program and say it's the evidence that it has made us safer is limited. instead it appears that the utility of the metadata program has been conflated with the success of other collection efforts. how do you determine how much surveillance, then, is too much? >> i think we have to weigh what is the size of the program, what is the magnitude of the collection and what are the results it's getting? and even more than that, even if it met that test, even if the metadata program was very successful, we also have to ask, is it necessary to collect all this data or can the program be restructured? in my view, the program can be restructured in a way that has the telecommunications providers retain their own data. i doesn't require the government to get all that data. when we suspect that a phone number is connected to a plot, then we go to the phone company, much as we would do in a criminal investigation. so i think we can get the same information we need. we can continue to protect the country. w
that nsa leaker edward snowden could be granted clemency. i want to bring in benjamin carden. senator carden, glad to have you here, sir. >> alex, good to be with you. >> edward snowden released what he called this manifesto for the truth. he says current debates about spying just prove his revelations are helping bring about change. what's your response to that? >> mr. snowden has caused real damage to this country. the manner in which he has conducted these releases have compromised our national security. as senator feinstein said, there's a way in which a whistleblower can get information to us. we want to make sure there's adequate oversight on the powers of the intelligence community. we need the right balance to keep us safe and protect the rights of americans. so there's concern on how we collect data, but for a person who has been given that access and trust on his own to do this type of release is detrimental to our country. >> sir, as you serve on the senate foreign relations committee, i know you're privy to things we are not necessarily. do you believe what we know so far
.s. surveillance practices. about 80% of the work agencies like nsa is outside the u.s. and is not governed by statutes. it is governed by guidelines that you or your predecessors put in place. are you looking at whether those guidelines provide any protection for foreign nationals? can you give any assurances abroad that the government is not doing this willy-nilly? >> as the president has indicated -- and he is right -- we are in the process of conducting a review of the surveillance activities to make sure we are striking a balance to keeping the american people safe and our allies safe and also guarding the civil liberties and privacy of those same people. we are in conversations with our partners in europe and other parts of the world to make sure we strike that balance. simply because we can do certain things does not necessarily mean we should do these things. i think that is the chief question that has to be resolved. it is almost a cost-benefit. what are the benefits we are receiving and what are the protections we are generating against the privacy that we necessarily have to give
on how much they trust their technology. all of the nsa scandals, obviously the real intrusion of social media in our everyday lives. you can't go out to dinner without someone having their phone placed next to their fork and knife. >> taking a picture of the food, which i do. >> young people know what we want, when we want it. if we don't want people prying in and having 1,000 facebook alerts on our phone, we're going to shut it off. i think people are becoming aware and regulating their facebook use. >> kathryn, i think it was you who made a note in our producer talking notes as they say, people tend to when they look at what their friends are doing, they really can't help themselves to comment. they can't help themselves to comment. we whine about our boyfriends. we are asking for commentary on that. you take it to the facebook level. >> jessica posted this. >> yeah, i think that could be maybe what's causing the stress in the relationships. maybe not having the mutual friends but maybe posting all of the things on the internet. that can obviously affect things. >> social media height
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